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90-9-90 Project
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Painting a picture of Ecolint's extensive and diverse alumni community in its 90th anniversary year. // Pour cette année de 90ème anniversaire de l’Ecolint, nous souhaitons brosser un tableau de notre communauté d’anciens élèves aussi étendue que diverse.

 

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90. Sarah Hathorn (Nations 2012)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 22 décembre 2014
Sarah Hathorn1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
I spent 5 years (2007-2012) studying at the Campus des Nations.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?

I finished my education in Swiss primary school and was looking for a welcoming multi-cultural environment for my secondary education. Nations seemed ideal and proved to be an excellent choice for me.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?

I had so many excellent teachers in Nations that simply naming one is a particularly difficult task. As a result, I’d have to say that the teachers who had the biggest impact on me were Mme Shaw, Mr. Marrable and Mr. De Wilde. They taught me how to think and analyse, to write well structured essays, honed my interest and ability in both arts and sciences, and gave me confidence that I could succeed in endeavors if I persevered.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
Oddly, I think my favourite spot on campus was the hallway. My friends and I always congregated in front of our lockers to decide what we would do and where to go next. We spent hours just chatting, waiting in front of our classrooms for class to begin. As a result, some of my fondest memories come from the many small interactions with fellow students and teachers during the day.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Balexert was one of my favourite places, as it had everything I could possibly want. After school, usually on Fridays, our group of friends would head there to grab a smoothie, explore Fnac, have some food and often watch movies in the cinema.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I am in my 3rd year in the University of St Andrews. I am studying for a Joint Honours Degree in Management and Persian. I am very happy to be studying both a language (a passion developed in Nations) and a more scientific subject such as Management.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
In this dynamic and ever-changing global market, Ecolint’s main focus should be to continue offering its excellent combination of arts and sciences and make sure to stay aware of the current trends and skills necessary to succeed in the professional world. I would recommend that Nations and other Ecolint schools add Business/Management as one of their IB Subjects.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?

“The greatest gift of education (…) is the years of shelter provided when learning,” Steven Erikson. The safe and multi-cultural atmosphere of Ecolint is truly special and enables you to learn a lot more than you can imagine. Take advantage of the time you have in school!


9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
It has given me a very solid grounding in knowledge and skills that I can still apply today. When speaking to students from other schools, I am aware of how fond I am of my high school in comparison to them. For me, Ecolint was a home and provided a circle of close friends and encouraging mentors.

 


 

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89. Joseph Scanio (LGB 1960)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 16 décembre 2014
Joeseph Scanio1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
One year, 1958-1959.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father, professor of Romance Languages at the University of Michigan had a sabbatical leave and we spent that year in my mother’s house in Gy.  She was born in Geneva, one of the first woman graduates of the University of Geneva, and came to the States in the 1930’s.  I have since inherited the house.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
P.K. Ghosh – Math – He allowed me to take calculus without having had trigonometry.  I was able to take sophomore physics as a freshman at Harvard, and graduate courses as a senior. And N. Poirel – English – She taught me precis, the most important skill I learned in high school.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?

Greek Theatre. Out of sight of the teachers.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Our village, Gy, and being able to bring fellow Ecolint students into the real Swiss countryside.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
Professor of Physics at the University of Cincinnati. Several sabbatical years and summers at CERN. My wife and I spend as much time as possible in my house in Gy. We’ll spend more time after retirement in 2015.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Teach students to think critically and to write well.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?

Learn to think critically and to write well, skills that will be invaluable throughout life whatever your academic or non-academic focus.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
Teachers were great, classes were great. Most importantly I got to know students from many, many countries and many, many backgrounds. A far cry from Ann Arbor High.

 


 

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88. Paula Cairney (LGB 1976)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 15 décembre 2014
Paula Cairney1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
Three years from 1973-76.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father worked for Union Carbide and was transferred to Geneva.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Anthony Short who opened my mind to the joy of literature and remains an influence 40 years later.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
L’Auberge at Grange Canal – it might as well have been part of the school campus!

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
The filets de perches restaurants along the lakeside at Hermance and Corsier Port

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I live in London where I work with Ministers at the Ministry of Justice as a policy advisor on issues relating to offender management in the community.  When I travel it’s on house exchanges in other countries where I like to live as part of the community and try on someone else’s life for size. My greatest achievement is raising a questioning, multi-lingual, Ecolint style eurobrat – in London.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
To prepare the next generation for the challenges they face and give them the confidence to engage.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Relish your time in a place that rewards intellectual rigour and tolerance because the rest of the world is not always like that.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
It taught me that difference is something to be celebrated, not feared or suppressed.  I was much influenced by the political debate and as a result have chosen a career centred on social inclusion.

 


 

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87. Daniel A. Reelfs (LGB 1942)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 15 décembre 2014

Daniel Reelfs1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
A total of six years. Four years to start with: 1928 to 1932 at Primary school. And then two more years to finish: 1940 to 1942 for the Matu fédérale

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My Dutch father, working for an international organization, and mother of Finnish nationality thought Ecolint would be the ideal place for my sister and I to start our  school years.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
It would be unfair to name one teacher in particular: each had his own impact on me in one way or another. Though my memory concerning period one is no longer working 100%, here are some remembrances. I entered Ecolint’s Primary school when it was still in downtown Geneva at rue Senebier. We then moved to La Grande Boissière. Teachers I remember were:
- Miss Hartog was like a Mother to us children of so many different origins. She will never be forgotten. I can't alas name any comrade present at that time.
- Nancy Travelletti taught us the rudiments of gardening and how to take care of pets. I remember well a rabbit I liked very much. Each child had also his own little piece of ground to experience the plant cycle, starting with sowing a seed. After her long professional career at Ecolint (1929 to 1972) as directrice of the girls’ Internat and then a teacher she retired and died at the age of 91.
- Madame Maurette was for a long time head of the school. She was its soul in a way, a driving force to all concerned with the school. Her Assemblies were always instructive and related to events of the day.
- Mr Bader lived in the building you met when arriving at the entry of the school premises. He was the first person to go to for information. A practical kind man, easy to talk to, who also taught carpentry.

During my Matu period which was also the beginning of the second world war, the teachers I remember well and liked, each one for his particular qualities and temperament, were:
- M. Roquette who cumulated the task of School Director with that of acquainting us with Swiss geography. At the end of the year we had a really good idea of the very complex nature of the country we were to live in during our school years. I remember  that at the end of the year, the main and less important rivers of Switzerland and their affluents had no longer any secrets for us.
- M. Meyhoffer's task was to acquaint us with Swiss history, a subject which helped much later in my life to better understand the complex nature of the country I was living in.
- Mr Charles Baudouin, our french teacher, was a man of many talents: poet, psychoanalyst, writer. As students, occupied with our matu program, we were alas not really conscious at the time of the privilege we had to be taught by such learned and dedicated personalities.
- Miss Hersch initiated us to Latin. It was my first go at this language and Miss Hersch did her best to help me attain sufficient knowledge of the language to enable me to pass the Matu.
- M. Drummond Thomson dealt with English and theatre.
- Last but not least : Mr Dumur our math teacher, kind and severe.                
Our class was small being four pupils of various origins : Galyani Mahidol of Thailand: Juliette Valentin who was Swiss-French; Bérengère Henchoz who was Swiss and myself, Dutch. Our objective: obtain the Matu Fédérale….which we all did. A group of pupils was studying during the same period in another classroom for the French baccalaureate. Among the pupils I remember well were Jean-Paul  Darmsteter,Tania Olian, Vadim Miselj, Guy Ito, Daisy and Georges Stencek  and Uli Zinnow.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The path bordering the sports field, which at that time was just plain grass and nothing else. Walking along it allowed you meet a variety of trees, mysterious caverns in bushes where one could hide etc. The vegetation changed its appearance with the seasons, giving you new visual sensations.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?

My favorite place in the wider region consisted in going up to Saint-Cergue and then walking up to La Dôle. From there you had a gorgeous view of lake Geneva and the French Alps alas unreachable during that war period.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
My life today is that of a retired man in the nineties with a charming wife keen on gardening and seeing to my welfare in every respect, doing for me more than I shall ever be able to do for her. Ah yes: I am also trying to get rid of all material objects accumulated during my lifetime, become useless but kept often just out of sentimentality.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
“One” of Ecolint’s top priorities could be to devote a small part of the annual fees of every student to help run a school in some deserving less fortunate country. Practically every year a request is sent to us alumni to help Ecolint enlarge the sports grounds - build a new annex - have paving stones with their name engraved on them etc. One could imagine with the above plan teachers of Ecolint going in turn to that school and participating for a few days/weeks in its welfare.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?

Remember that when you leave this world for good, the greatest wealth you can take with you is not your fortune or material goods (see question 6) but how positive you can be in your relations with other human beings.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
I try to see in every person I meet, whatever his/her geographic origin, colour, language etc.,  a soul which incarnated on this earth to continue to learn how to deal with the problems of life.

 


 

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86. Christine Kjellberg (LGB 1954)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 15 décembre 2014
Christine Kjellberg1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
I spent five years from 1949.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father started working at WHO, being a Scandinavian doctor who knew French, which was rather unusual at that time. So my mother and my brothers and myself, we all moved to Geneva and lived in Avenue Kreig, in the first high-rise building in that area.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Robert Stump who taught art, theatre and ballroom dancing. The cafeteria of today in La Grande Boissière was then a place for daily assemblies and a stage for theatre productions. Madame Wend, who taught French; since I make no mistakes in grammar or spelling, she was a good pedagogue. Monsieur Briquet, who taught English, was a kind and funny teacher. He named his daughter after me – I think.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
It was probably the Internat, which I would have loved to be living in, away from strict parents – sorry Daddy! And the Terrace des Marronniers.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
The vineyards, a new phenomenon for us Nordic people, and Montreux by the lake.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I live in Stockholm and participate in a fair-trade shop, where all the objects are produced outside Sweden. This is to keep up with the multi-cultural ideas from Ecolint. I also enjoy speaking Swedish, my mother tongue, which has remained dormant for so many years. My children do not speak it.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Top priority? Have excellent teachers and encourage the students to STUDY. We had too much fun in my time!

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Study, enjoy life and be aware that you are very privileged. Keep your FRIENDS. This demands that you give back, which I suppose most of us do.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
To meet students and teachers from the whole world; learn languages; understand that we are all the same in feelings and aspirations. And meeting my husband Nicolas at school. I think Ecolint stays in my life as the most important palce and also from where my best friends are, still today.

 


 

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85. Felipe Trucco (LGB 1979)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 15 décembre 2014
Felipe Trucco1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
From 1977 to 1979.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father was transferred to Geneva as the Chilean Representative to the UN.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
I can’t pick just one - there are two. Mr. Gras who challenged me to accept “intellectual baggage” as a life long lesson. Mr. Rowe who made history a lesson in overcoming mistakes. Both of these fine gentlemen I credit for my appreciation of education.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The Senior Lawn. Great place to unwind, hangout and decompress between classes.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
The Alps and the lake. No explanation needed.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
After Geneva we bounced around a bit with stints in New York, Brussels and Chile. I finished my undergrad degrees and earned an MBA in Brussels. Moved to Chile and worked for an investment bank for about a year. Relocated to New Jersey and married in ’89. After 22 moves, I have settled in NJ (about an hour from New York City) with my wife and three kids. I work for IBM.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
When I arrived at Ecolint I immediately sensed the Community of Inclusion. Everyone was from everywhere. This element of belonging and participation, I believe, needs to be maintained and nurtured. I’m proud to say, when asked “where are you from”,  that “I’m from everywhere”.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Take advantage of every opportunity to experience your world. Absorb and appreciate your Ecolint education. It is unique and its impact will become clearly evident somewhere along your journey.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
The ability to perceive from various points of view and creatively challenge assumptions.

 


 

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84. José Burle de Figueiredo (LGB 1963)

Posted By Alumni Office, vendredi 12 décembre 2014
José Burle de Figueiredo1. Combien de temps avez-vous passé à l’Ecolint ?
Cinq ans jusqu’à la maturité fédérale en 1963.

2. Comment êtes-vous arrivé à l’Ecolint ?
Par hasard, attiré par ce qu’en disait des amis et le local avec le parc.

3. Quel(le) enseignant(e) a eu le plus fort impact sur vous et pourquoi ?
M. Jean Meyer, très direct et clair.

4. Quel était votre endroit préféré sur le campus et pourquoi ?
Le Château, le bâtiment en soi et le parc à récréation.

5. Quel était votre lieu préféré dans la région et pourquoi ?
Le parc et le terrain de foot, car j’ai joué pour l’équipe de l’Ecolint.

6. Décrivez votre vie aujourd’hui, le lieu où vous vivez et ce que vous faites.
Retraité à Genève, je voyage un peu partout en Europe.

7. Quelle devrait être la priorité de l’Ecolint alors qu’elle approche de son 100ème anniversaire ?
Se spécialiser encore davantage dans un enseignement à des jeunes qui vont vivre dans un monde globalisé.

8. Quelles « sages conseils » pourriez-vous prodiguer aux élèves d’aujourd’hui ?
Etudiez les maths ou la philosophie ou les deux, avant de vous spécialiser, mais toujours dans un sujet que vous aimez beaucoup.

9. Quel élément de votre scolarité à l’Ecolint a le plus influencé votre vie ?
Liberté et sens de responsabilité.

 


 

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83. Eduard van Beyma (LGB 1960)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 9 décembre 2014
Eduard van Beyma1. Combien de temps avez-vous passé à l'Ecolint ?
De 1956 à 1960, quatre ans.

2. Comment êtes-vous arrivé à l'Ecolint ?
Mon père travaillait au Conseil Œcuménique des Églises, à Genève.

3. Quel(le) enseignant(e) a eu le plus fort impact sur vous et pourquoi ?
Monsieur Meyer, parce qu’il me semblait le plus sympathique envers les jeunes.

4. Quel était votre endroit préféré sur le campus et pourquoi ?
Les marronniers, à cause de la beauté du site. Dans le bois autour du terrain de foot, pour se balader inaperçus avec mes ami(e)s.

5. Quel était votre lieu préféré dans la région et pourquoi ?
Au milieu du Pont du Mont-Blanc, où je devais dire adieu à mon grand amour qui retournait au Pays-Bas en 1960. Elle est devenu ma chère épouse. En ce moment elle me regarde et elle me demande pourquoi je rigole en tapant sur mon ordinateur.

6. Décrivez votre vie aujourd'hui, le lieu où vous vivez et ce que vous faites.

Après une carrière de conseiller d’entreprises et de manager aux Pays-Bas, mon pays de naissance, je m’occupe en tant que « pensionado » de projets de bénévolat dans laculture (musées), le cancer, la dégustation de vins. Je passe également du temps avec ma famille, dont mes5 petits-enfants. Je n’aime pas m’ennuyer!

7. Quelle devrait être la priorité de l'Ecolint alors qu'elle approche de son 100ème anniversaire ?

Une excellente éducation, créative, qui inspire la curiosité dans une atmosphère où la fraternité entre les hommes est continuellement privilégiée.

8. Quelles « sages conseils » pourriez-vous prodiguer aux élèves d’aujourd’hui ?
Ouvrez vos yeux, ouvrez vos oreilles, soyez curieux toute votre vie. Pour tout problème il n’y a pas qu’une seule solution.

9. Quel élément de votre scolarité à l'Ecolint a le plus influencé votre vie ?
Être accueilli dans une classe où personne ne parlait ma langue maternelle comme si j’étais instantanément un membre de la famille.

 


 

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82. Jean-Paul Darmsteter (LGB 1942)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 9 décembre 2014
Jean-Paul Darmsteter1. Combien de temps avez-vous passé à l'Ecolint ?
Trois années en pleine guerre (de 1940 à 1942).

2. Comment êtes-vous arrivé à l'Ecolint ?
Je naquis moi-même à Genève, de père belge (décédé) et de mère française. Entre les programmes scolaires français et suisses, l’Ecolint parut à ma mère un heureux compromis qui se révéla providentiel.

3. Quel(le) enseignant(e) a eu le plus fort impact sur vous et pourquoi ?

De loin Charles Baudouin, écrivain et poète, m’entrouvrit les portes de la littérature, de la poésie. Je gardai avec lui et avec son fils Rolland, lui-même élève à l’Ecolint, d’excellentes relations pendant de longues années.

4. Quel était votre endroit préféré sur le campus et pourquoi ?
Les promenades dans le parc avec mes camarades.

5. Quel était votre lieu préféré dans la région et pourquoi ?
La campagne genevoise à vélo.

6. Décrivez votre vie aujourd'hui, le lieu où vous vivez et ce que vous faites.
J’ai aujourd’hui 91 ans. Je suis établi à Genève après avoir vécu quelques années en France, avant la guerre, puis, la paix retrouvée, je parcourus professionnellement, parfois brièvement, de nombreuses régions du monde.

7. Quelle devrait être la priorité de l'Ecolint alors qu'elle approche de son 100ème anniversaire ?
Plus que jamais partager avec ses élèves la volonté de contribuer, chacun à sa manière, à la paix universelle.

8. Quelles « sages conseils » pourriez-vous prodiguer aux élèves d’aujourd’hui ?
S’inspirer, sa vie durant, des idéaux de l’Ecolint.

9. Quel élément de votre scolarité à l'Ecolint a le plus influencé votre vie ?
Ma vie professionnelle de reporter parcourant le monde (jusque dans des pays en guerre) s’est toujours efforcée de maintenir cette vision et de souhaiter la faire partager.

 


 

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81. Gabriel Barton (LGB 1952)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 8 décembre 2014

Gabriel Barton(Gabriel Blau)

1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
1946-47

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
As a refugee.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Impressions even more lasting than those of my subject-teachers were left by the bracingly benign personalities of Monsieur Stump (in charge of the Villa), of Chef Schaller, and of Madame Travaletti.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The courtyard in front of the main building (for free-and-easy socializing), and, for obvious reasons, the library.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Not mobile enough to sample it.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I am a professor (now emeritus) of theoretical physics at the University of Sussex, living nearby, close to Lewes;  have enjoyed  some of the associated teaching; and enjoy continuing research undistracted by requests to fill in forms and to quantify unquantifiables.   

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Having watched student numbers in other institutions climb from a few hundred into the thousands, I wonder about the problems of preserving the ambience, outward-looking yet secure, that was so miraculous about Ecolint early post-war.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
I am short of wisdom, but  would commend (1) the un-Marxist view that one must understand a lot about the world to change any of it  for the better; and (2) the aspiration, in the words of one of Marguerite Yourcenar’s protagonists, de se garder « de faire de la vérité une idole, préférant lui laisser son nom plus humble d'exactitude ».

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
The experience that it is possible at least to try and see people and issues not incapacitatingly encumbered by the peculiarities of their background and of my own (native or acquired); and learning French, plus some of its habits of thought.

 


 

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80. Jacqueline Burt (LGB 1959)

Posted By Alumni Office, vendredi 5 décembre 2014

(Jacquie Richardson)

Jacqueline Burt1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
I was there twice. From 1948-1951 and 1956-1959.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father worked for the B.I.T..

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
I would single out several who promoted and helped me with my interest in poetry and history: first Mrs Stump, then later Mme Briquet and Mr Leach, and of course Mr Quin.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
I actually had two: the library where I would immerse myself in books and read, forgetting what time it was. And the last window sill of the dining room area before you turned to exit the school, where I would meet Rita Kaul (still my best friend), Rima Alamuddin (RIP), Vijaya Kumar, Supriyo Roy, Francoise (Genevoise - forget her last name!); and later The Green Door with Barry Haigh. I remember involving Rita when business was brisk!

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
To this day the Chateau de Chillon and Gruyère remain two of my favorite haunts, and Saas Fe where I went skiing.; Paquis plage, where I belonged to the Polo Club; the Cercle d'Escrime; and the Old Town.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I recently moved to Las Vegas with my husband John, who is retired from the Air Force. Being retired from the business world, I now have more time to write historical factual/fiction novels. My third one, "Hatshepsut - Pharaoh Queen", is about to come out. My others are "Fiona" and "Red Deer", the latter two set in the 1700s. Also soon to come out, the life of Temuchin (Ghengis Khan) as told by his sister. I also have an agent for my film scripts.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Try to maintain the balance between education and individuality, and to maintain a global perspective on life and the environment. Also, to learn from history.

8.  What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?

It's never too late to be who you want to be. The world is changed by your example, not your opinion.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
That we are all the same no matter the external wrappings and to see beyond those outward appearances.

 


 

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79. Alvaro de Soto (LGB 1960)

Posted By Alumni Office, mercredi 3 décembre 2014
Alvaro de Soto1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
11 years.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
Call it exile: my father, a career diplomat from Peru, resigned while serving abroad when the democratically elected President was overthrown. Barred from returning to his own country, he managed to get a job at the ILO in Geneva.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?

A tie between Elizabeth Briquet, who saw something in this underperforming student and ignited it, and Bob Leach, whose history classes linger with me to this day.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The quadrangle in front of the main building, because everybody was there.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
There are so many places charged with memories nearby that I can’t select just one.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
Retired as both a Peruvian diplomat and a UN Official, I am still hard at work talking about conflict resolution at Sciences Po in Paris (the spring semester), working on the boards (mainly advisory) of several NGOs, writing articles, chapters and forewords for books as well as one (perhaps two) of my own. I spend about 5 months a year in New York, the rest traveling.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Making sure that the third-culture kids it nurtures are able to function in a complex world where the concept of home is under severe strain.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Stay tolerant and promote inclusion. Keep up your languages. Floss. Take care of your knees. Remember we weren’t built to last as long as we do.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
See previous point: it instilled tolerance and a certain knack for understanding what makes others tick.

 


 

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78. Ronan Royer (La Chât 1986)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 2 décembre 2014
Ronan Royer1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
My whole school life! Rue Schaub for primary, LGB for grades 7 & 8 (French section) and La Châtaigneraie from grade 9 to 13.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My (French) parents, having extensively travelled, settled in Geneva in 1967 (when I was born) and thought it a good idea. It most certainly was.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Gosh, where to begin? Miss Sutton in primary in Schaub, Mr. Welton for the best Computer Studies class ever and my subsequent love of everything tech, Mr. Welling for Geography and giving me a real understanding of weather, Mr. Cogswell for his patience at my obvious lack of ability for the maths of Physics (although I love the subject!), Mme. d’Amico in French for her help.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The dances! Highlight of my time at La Chât, above the gym… And the Motel, of course, in later years.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Must be the skiing, and the unforgettable ski days.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
In London since 1991, director of my own company designing and producing corporate events Europe-wide since 2002. Married with two children aged 17 and 11, both attending French school (so fully bilingual and bi-cultural too).

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Teaching the values of inclusion and tolerance. Ensuring students truly understand values beyond those monetary.  Fulfilment comes in many forms.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Know when to throw yourself in the path of opportunity.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
Openness, awareness of others, an outlook unhindered by national boundaries or customs. A love of discovery.

 


 

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77. Sarah Logan (LGB 1985)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 2 décembre 2014
Sarah Logan1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
From 1976 to 1984.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
Like many others, we moved to Geneva for my father’s job.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?

Mr. Orange – I STILL use that darn margin template he taught us when I write and I still haven’t gotten over being “fired” from the school musical because I was late two days in a row…never mind that I was getting help with some math from Mr. Cooper!! Mr. Dorsay – who made me love art and believe that even though I had no talent, I could still make beautiful things. And Mr. Borle – who challenged us all in the first week of school that a “7” in his class could never happen because no one was perfect. Guess what Mr. Borle? I was only perfect once!

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The radiators by the windows in the cafeteria where we all used to hang out in the winters. Many a friendship was fostered there. What a shame that wonderful old cafeteria is gone. The Greek Theatre – does anyone realise what an amazing thing it was/is? Every school should have one. And of course, the senior hill – how could you have a boyfriend without it?!

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Vielle Ville, Molard, Verbier, Auberge de la Poste, Shorts, the quai that went out to the Jet d’Eau, the excessiveness of Rue du Rhône, the farmers' market at Rive on Wednesday and Saturday.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
Today I live on a lake, not nearly as beautiful as Léman, in a bizarre little town about 45 minutes west of New York City. I work as a veterinarian and have my own practice. I am married for 18 years (wow…) and am a mother to three amazing kids, two dogs and a very obnoxious cat.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Continue to foster understanding, tolerance, patience and collaboration that seems to exist at Ecolint without anyone trying to create it. To me, that is one of the most remarkable things about Ecolint. Religion, colour, ethnicity, language and socioeconomic differences seem to blend together as “Ecolintism”. Students learn to like or dislike one another for the person or personality, not because they are “different”. We were all different. And in being so, we were all one.  

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
You cannot possibly understand, at such a young age, the miracle of what happens at Ecolint. It is not something that years of administrators can take credit for…it just happens. Learn from your teachers, your peers, your mentors. Try to understand each and every point of view that is presented to you before you take a side. Try to understand that each story has more than one side and that you will go further with inquiry and tolerance than anything else. There is no one right way to see or do anything. The vastness of life’s possibilities are all around you in your peers. Embrace them.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
Open mindedness. Tolerance. To have huge aspirations. Never take no for an answer. Work hard. Play hard. And an effort to try and instill those things in my own children.

 


 

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76. Maria Bonacchi (LGB 2008)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 2 décembre 2014
Maria Bonacchi1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
I spent four years, from 2004 till 2008.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?

Having moved from Miami to Geneva, my parents wanted me to attend an international school, so it would be easier for me to adapt to the school’s curriculum. My father’s company recommended Ecolint saying it was a good school; also, many children whose parents worked in the company had attended Ecolint as well.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
I liked my Biology and Chemistry classes in year 12 and year 13, given by Mrs. De Smet and Mr. Guhirwa respectively. I suppose it was how they taught in class that sparked my interest in wanting to study Life Sciences later on at the University of Navarre, Spain.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
I suppose my favourite spot was the Cafeteria. I remember I spent a lot of time there with my group of friends, whether it was during recess, lunch break or just simply hanging out.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
I think my favourite spot is the Einsiedeln Abbey, in the Schwyz canton. It’s an important place of pilgrimage for Catholics in Switzerland. I had gone there with my mother during my school years. I recently went back with a friend of mine to pray to the Madonna. The views on the trip itself are worth seeing, crossing all the way through typical Swiss meadows and towns till you reach Einsiedeln and see within the Abbey, a beautiful Black Madonna figure holding Baby Jesus.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
As of today, I’m an environmental biologist searching for employment. When I finished my Master’s Degree in Navarre, Spain, I decided to move back in with my parents and try my work chances here in Geneva.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
I believe Ecolint’s top priority is its student body and the cultural melting pot it holds, even more with the new technologies and social media interacting with them 24/7.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Enjoy your time at school, because we only go through that stage of our lives once. At the same time, jump at the opportunity of making friends and getting to know cultures from other places. And last but not least, don’t be in such a hurry to grow up!

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
I would say it has been an eye and mind opener regarding cultural mingling. Before coming to Ecolint, I had lived in Buenos Aires and Miami, but these cities showed the Argentine and American way of life. Here I was able to get to know other religions, cultures (which you respect above all) as well as learn new languages which are helping me grow as an individual.

 


 

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75. Kaj Fölster (LGB 1954)

Posted By Alumni Officer, lundi 1 décembre 2014

(Kaj Myrdal)

Kaj Fölster1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
From 1947 to 1953 (Moyenne A up to Secondaire A completed) at LGB.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father was appointed Head of the Economic Commission for Europe ECE at the UN. We came from Sweden and I knew no other language. I was 11 years old. My parents sought a modern school, a co-educational school. The public ones were very inflexible. After a year my sister and I refused to change school. We just loved Ecolint! I had never thought we could love a school!

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Chef Schaller, Mlle. Hartoch, Mme. Maurette, M. Bader, M. Imhoof, Mlle. Traveletti... oh, there were so many!

4. Quel était votre endroit préféré sur le campus et pourquoi ?
Le parc à cause des arbres, du parcours et des sports ; la scène de théâtre et la menuiserie à cause de la créativité.

5. Quel était votre lieu préféré dans la région et pourquoi ?
Le lac, les excursions au ski (Verbier avec Chef Schaller) et les entreprises avec mes amis et amies.

6. Décrivez votre vie aujourd’hui, le lieu où vous vivez et ce que vous faites.
A ma retraite, je suis retournée en Suède, auprès de la famille de mon fils et de mes petits-enfants. Je suis active dans le domaine des échanges entre groupes politiques et culturels allemands et suédois. Je m’occupe également de rencontres internationales et de projets interculturels en rapport avec l’Union européenne, ainsi que divers autres projets internationaux concernant la condition féminine. L’une de mes filles habite Berlin, l’autre Dar-Es-Salaam ce qui me fait faire de nombreux voyages vers ces deux villes.

7. Quelle devrait être la priorité de l’Ecolint alors qu’elle approche de son 100ème anniversaire ?
La priorité que j’ai connue à L’Ecolint: les efforts pour la paix doivent être profondément enracinés en nous tous à travers la connaissance des uns et des autres et des faits, sur la base du respect et de l’amour de la diversité.

8. Quelles « sages conseils » pourriez-vous prodiguer aux élèves d’aujourd’hui ?
Chef Schaller nous disait: Regarde haut, regarde loin. Et en avant ! Mme Maurette nous disait : N’oubliez jamais la vitesse à laquelle la justice peut être démolie. N’oubliez jamais votre responsabilité.

9. Quel élément de votre scolarité à l’Ecolint a le plus influencé votre vie ?
La joie de connaître beaucoup de langues m’a bouleversée et ne m’a jamais quittée. Mais aussi qu’une école puisse être aussi visionnaire et si fondamentalement humaine, et que ces valeurs soient garantes d’une atmosphère où l’on apprend avec joie et confiance. Finalement, la possibilité de partager tout cela avec tant de personnes venant de différentes cultures. Merci Ecolint !


 


 

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74. James Jorgensen (LGB 1987)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 25 novembre 2014
James Jorgensen1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
From 1978 to 1987 (I.B. completion).

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father worked for Digital Equipment Corporation in Norway and we were supposed to move to Iran but the revolution broke out as we were getting ready to do so. Geneva was presented as an alternative which he happily accepted.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Many great teachers, but Mr Dorsay, Mr Sharpe and Mr Kerswell had the most positive impact. Mostly it was a healthy combination of positive encouragement and a wry perspective on things that made them likeable and the received wisdom memorable.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
Window sill of the cafeteria – a great niche for reading, sketching and contemplating life.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Société Nautique de Genève. Through Felicity Leach and rowing at the SNG I had exposure to and closer contact with the Swiss community. It made the whole Ecolint experience feel less insular and detached, more like ‘home’.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I live near the beach outside of Santa Cruz, California with my wife Saghi (from Iran). I am a partner in a small industrial design company and do most of my work from home. Primarily we collaborate with larger companies to do aerospace work dealing with modifications for special missions aircraft, but we’ve worked on everything from guitars to orbital rockets. Before this I spent 9 years as an architect and 6 years as a test pilot/design engineer for a small start-up.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Build on the I.B. programme to extend it to a greater audience. As a model for education that provides critical exposure to a variety of information and ideas at a formative time of life, it really works. I would discourage any attempt to get rid of the more tactile and visual arts. These are critical to any design and engineering endeavour and could stand to be integrated that way to a greater degree. Computer Aided Design (CAD), 3D printing and robotics are changing the world. These technologies and their implications need to be understood to better navigate the future.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Ecolint is as good as it gets. You will never get the breadth of exposure to people and activites in as idyllic a setting as you are experiencing right now. If you choose to leave Geneva, there is a significant chance that you will regret it. If you must leave, remember what it was like, and try to make wherever you go more like it. It’s bound to make the world a better place.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
It has caused me to see things from all points of view. It has transformed any sense of nationalism into a dated concept, worth celebrating with a meal, but certainly not worth killing or dying for.

 


 

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73. Tessa Heuer (LGB 2000)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 24 novembre 2014

(Tessa Wesling)

Tessa Heuer1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
Six years.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
We moved from Germany for my dad's work.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Mr Andrew Colley –  he introduced me to acting.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The theatre – because I love theatre and acting.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Les Gets – to go skiing with the family.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I live in Darmstadt, Germany, where I'm married with two young kids. I work as a PA at Merck.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Keep growing.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Enjoy every moment in the international community.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
The diversity in classes and interests.

 


 

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72. Nancy O'Connor (LGB 1962)

Posted By Alumni Office, lundi 24 novembre 2014

(Nancy Myers)

Nancy O'Connor1. Combien de temps avez-vous passé à l'Ecolint ?
De janvier 1954 à juin 1959, à LGB.

2. Comment êtes-vous arrivé à l'Ecolint ?
Mon père a accepté un poste au BIT (Bureau International du Travail) fin 1953, après avoir travaillé pour le plan Marshall à Paris à partir de l'été 1948.

3. Quel(le) enseignant(e) a eu le plus fort impact sur vous et pourquoi ?
Comment choisir ? Mlle Darolle, M. Champendal, Chef Schaller, Mme Travaletti, Mlle Brunel, Mlle Groeflin, M. Leach, M. Hussein: Chacun adorait son travail; chacun respectait ses étudiants et était par conséquent exigeant; chacun a laissé son empreinte.

4. Quel était votre endroit préféré sur le campus et pourquoi ?
Le mur au fond du parc qui surplombait la route de Chêne; mais aussi, comme Alfonso, le snack à la Grange Canal...

5. Quel était votre lieu préféré dans la région et pourquoi ?
Les bords du Lac Léman, et surtout Genève plage.

6. Décrivez votre vie aujourd'hui, le lieu où vous vivez et ce que vous faites.
J'habite maintenant en Floride, aux USA ; mais j'ai passé plus de 30 ans dans le Vermont, à enseigner la langue et la littérature françaises au niveau universitaire. Aujourd'hui je me dissipe ! J'aime faire de la traduction pour mon plaisir, et voyager, surtout en France.

7. Quelle devrait être la priorité de l'Ecolint alors qu'elle approche de son 100ème anniversaire ?
Continuer d'inculquer l'ouverture aux autres, quelle que soit leur nationalité, leur race, leur politique.

8. Quelles « sages conseils » pourriez-vous prodiguer aux élèves d’aujourd’hui ?
Appréciez la chance que vous avez de passer du temps dans un endroit, dans une communauté, avec des professeurs et des camarades, qui marqueront votre âme et votre vie sans peut-être que vous le sachiez sur le moment. Pour moi, les souvenirs d'Ecolint seront toujours magiques.

9. Quel élément de votre scolarité à l'Ecolint a le plus influencé votre vie ?
C'est ici pour la première fois que j'ai compris combien j'aimais apprendre, et explorer de nouveaux domaines; mais aussi combien mes camarades et mes professeurs pouvaient m'apporter. L'école soudain n'était plus une corvée, mais une famille, expérience que je n'ai plus retrouvée avant l'université...

 


 

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71. Richard Corbett (LGB 1973)

Posted By Alumni Office, jeudi 20 novembre 2014
Richard Corbett1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
Ten years.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father worked for the WHO.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Several, so it would be wrong to single out just one.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
Senior lawn.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
The lake.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.

I'm a Member of the European Parliament, representing Yorkshire (UK) for the Labour party, working to make a success of the European Union in the world's only internationally elected parliament.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Keep educating in a spirit of internationalism.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Learn to think outside the box of national perceptions and received cultural assumptions.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
International awareness, inter-cultural learning, appreciation of the fact that national sovereignty with no international legal order can be a threat to all of us.

 


 

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70. Fleur Wesling (LGB 2007)

Posted By Alumni Office, jeudi 20 novembre 2014
Fleur Wesling1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
Nine years.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My father’s work moved to Geneva

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Mr. Edmundo Timm.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The theatre: it was my favourite subject and great things happened there.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Town.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I live in Geneva where I am a marketing executive for a Video on Demand company.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Students should be able to have their text books digitally, as the heavy books are not only expensive but hard to carry around.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
People say college is the best time of your life, but really its the time you spend here.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
Dealing with multicultural people and understanding them even though backgrounds may be completely different.

 


 

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69. Rock Brynner (LGB 1963)

Posted By Alumni Office, jeudi 20 novembre 2014
Rock Brynner1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
I was at Ecolint for three years, 1960-1963, age 13-16.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
I had heard of Ecolint from Steven North (1960) and Kerry Kelly (1960), both children of two family friends, film composer Alex North and dancer/actor Gene Kelly.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
For many of us, the English classes with John Mawson had the most profound effect in making literature, especially Shakespeare and Milton, come to life. As well, the theatre productions he directed were fantastically ambitious, approached with much greater seriousness than any "school play," whether it was "Midsummer Night's Dream" in the dining room or "Hedda Gabler" at the Theâtre de la Cour St. Pierre (two of the productions in which I performed). Before his death in 1996, I helped raise some money for John at the 1994 reunion, and dozens of alumni called John the best teacher they had ever had anywhere.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
I loved the back terrace behind the principal's office and the Green Door, where we used to buy sodas and snacks. It's still lovely there, though the Centre des arts now blocks the view.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
Oh, so many. From Movenpick (now gone) to the Genève plage to Salève to Café de Paris. . . .

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I am now bracing for my 36th winter on a hilltop 100 km north of New York City. As an author of numerous books and a professor of History and Political Science, I am currently writing an environmental history of electricity. More importantly, in 2012 Governor Andrew Cuomo appointed me to the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law, which advises the state legislature on bioethical issues, "comprised of leaders in the field of religion, philosophy, law, medicine, nursing, and bioethics". It deals with cutting-edge bioethics issues, including the withholding and withdrawing of life-sustaining treatment, assisted-reproductive technologies, organ transplantation, assisted suicide, genetic testing, etc.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Ecolint's top priority should be just what it has always been: to foster a truly international life and experience for students, an intense academic experience in which sharing daily challenges and delights across ALL international, cultural and religious backgrounds seeds the separate societies of the world with the internationalist perspective that Ecolint students have developed from LIVING it.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
My words of wisdom for students today: Take a big bite out of life and let the juices run down your chin.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
Ecolint's impact on my life has been incalculable, even in the phases where I was focused on one small corner of the world. But it is also ineffable. How can one measure or define the benefits of speaking more than one language, much less growing up with a strong, daily awareness of the wide variety of cultures from which individuals emerge? I think many alumni like myself spend the rest of our lives seeking or at least pining for that world we knew at Ecolint, where everyone around you was as aware as yourself of the superficiality of the national and cultural distinctions that others see as so profound.

 


 

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68. Dawn Rodriguez (LGB 1971)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 18 novembre 2014

(Dawn Adams)

Dawn Rodriguez1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
Three years – 1965 to 1968 at LGB.

2.  How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?

My father who was in the foreign service, was posted to the Sri Lanka Consulate in Geneva so we moved to Geneva from Sri Lanka (then known as Ceylon).

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
There were several. Philip Thomas was my geography teacher and his classes were so interesting and lively. He instilled an interest in other countries and cultures in me. He had a genuine concern for his students and always appreciated the work I did. I also liked Mr Leach, my history teacher whose dramatic presentation made history come alive in the classroom and whose homework assignments taught me to work independently, to think creatively and to think “outside the box”.  Glyn Uzzell was my art teacher and encouraged me to paint. I do watercolours and oils today and have also learnt to paint electronically using my mouse instead of a paintbrush!

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The Greek Theatre, under the shade of the old walnut tree. I loved sitting there on summer days with my friends, chatting. I  also liked the wooded area surrounding the football field. I remember picking sprigs of holly and gathering mistletoe off the trees in winter.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
The whole of Geneva was amazing. I enjoyed walks by the lake which was not far from our home. It was so serene and especially picturesque in summer. I also liked the old town with its cobbled streets, little cafes and quaint shops… and the “Theatre de la cour St. Pierre” where Ecolint used to stage its annual opera/operetta .(I was in the choir). I enjoyed shopping at “Grand Passage” and “La Placette”.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
Currently, I live in Colombo, Sri Lanka. After completing my Bachelor of Arts degree in English in Sri Lanka in 1978, I had a stint in teaching and lecturing and then moved into marketing and advertising with J. Walter Thompson (JWT). I was the business manager of Sri Lanka’s first private radio station, FM 99. Next, I handled public relations, working for Bates Strategic Alliance. I finally handled corporate communications for  the International Water Management Organization (IWMI), an international research organization, based in Sri Lanka. IWMI had offices across Africa and Asia, so my job involved a certain amount of travel which was great.  I retired from full time employment in 2011, but continue to work as a freelance communications specialist and writer. I married Rex Rodriguez in 1977 and we had two lovely daughters, now grown up and married. One lives in Sri Lanka, the other is in the Shetland Islands, UK. Sadly, my husband died of non-Hodgkins lymphoma in 2010, after 33 years of marriage. I have two little grandchildren and enjoy visiting and spending time with them in the Shetland Islands.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Ecolint should continue to produce “world citizens” who have a thorough understanding of global issues and  who can contribute to making an impact in this world. Ecolint should foster a culture that focuses on things that bind people together, The world today tends to focus on differences, which creates radicalism and lack of tolerance.This divides people.We should think as one global family.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?

Make the most of the diverse, all-round educational opportunities at Ecolint. Absorb the international environment and integrate with those of other cultures. It will enrichen you, expand your perspectives and equip you to make a difference in your community.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
The friends I made at Ecolint and the multi-cultural environment helped me to work in harmony with people from other countries.Thanks to my experience at Ecolint, although it was just three years, I have developed as a person and have been able to handle numerous challenges in my work and personal life. In addition, my Ecolint education gave me the ability to appreciate and value life and to go out and make changes where there was a need.

 


 

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67. Paola Sartorio (LGB 1990)

Posted By Alumni Office, vendredi 14 novembre 2014
Paola Sartorio1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
Three years, from 1987 to 1990.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
I was looking for a boarding school and Ecolint seemed the perfect combination of boarding school and city life.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Mr. Robertson, for the seeds that he planted in my mind, and Mrs. Formenti, for the way she loved her students.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
The bench close to the main gate; I could see who was coming in and out and chat with friends.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
I did not have one place in particular but I loved walking around Geneva. My favourite restaurant was l’Entrecôte where my parents would take me whenever they visited.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
I live in Rome and manage the Fulbright programme, a scholarship programme between Italy and the USA. In 2006 I became the mother of boy-girl twins.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
In an increasingly international global world, Ecolint has a lot to offer when it comes to living together.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?
Ecolint is a unique place where anyone feels part of it!

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
Ecolint taught me to embrace diversity and develop a curiosity for the rest of the world. Not to mention that in three years I became fluent in three languages!

 


 

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66. Mergen Davaapil (LGB 2003)

Posted By Alumni Office, mardi 11 novembre 2014
Mergen Davaapil1. How long did you spend at Ecolint?
I spent 6 years at Ecolint.

2. How did you come to attend Ecolint in the first place?
My parents moved to Geneva from Mongolia.

3. Which teacher had the biggest impact on you and how?
Mrs DeSmet  - Biology. She really was/is passionate about our well-being. I remember during our IB Exam, right before our Biology exam, she came over to the exam hall (which was on an off-campus location) to answer any last minute questions. Passion for your work always shows in the results.

4. What was your favourite spot on campus and why?
I don’t remember; I liked the whole campus I think.

5. What was your favourite place in the wider region, and why?
I still visit Geneva a lot but I highly recommend Zermatt.

6. Describe your life today, where you live and what you do.
Since graduating, I lived and worked in three different countries. Today, I am based out of New York and work at a mid-sized primary research firm.

7. What should be Ecolint's top priority as it approaches its 100th anniversary?
Promote tolerance and teach children to explore their cultural differences.

8. What "words of wisdom" would you pass on to today's Ecolint students?

Don’t take for granted the academic and professional doors Ecolint opens. Focus on doing well in school and learn to maintain your relationships with your schoolmates. It is really easy to lose touch with your fellow students after graduating.

9. What has been the biggest impact of your Ecolint education on your life?
I have friends in every corner of the world.

 


 

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